Why The Colonists Won The American Revolution - France


At the time of the American Revolution, the British held a well-trained, experienced army as well as the world's strongest navy. They were well supplied with artillery, provisions, gunpowder, firearms, as well as experienced officers who had fought in many European wars. Compared to the untrained, small army of the newly formed American colony, whom were also suffering from ration and weaponry shortages and a divided, weak government, it should be clear which side had the advantage by far. However, there are many more factors that concluded the end result of the American Revolution with the American Colonists displaying an impressive triumph.
The Siege of Yorktown - Cornwallis surrenders to French (left) and American (right) soldiers.
The Siege of Yorktown - Cornwallis surrenders to French (left) and American (right) soldiers.

The Americans' alliances with foreign countries provided a significant improvement to their circumstances, particularly their pact with the French. These alliances may not have existed had the Americans not 'proven their potential' during their victories with small battles, scrimages, and invasions. With the British in debt from the previous war (Seven Years War), with their wealthy supplied thoroughly used through, they surely weren't in the prime position to be starting another war. Their triumph (propoganda) created by the Americans sent an important message to other countries that this was an opportunity to join forces with them and bring down the British, resulting in the Franco-American alliance and France's involvement in the war. The French stopped British troops from reaching the new colony, and together, they trapped Cornwallis at Yorktown (Siege of Yorktown - Right). France's help offered financial aid, weapons, fleets, and soldiers to the Americans, while the Spanish supplied them with medicine, muskets, cloth and gunpowder. As the war progressed, the Dutch also joined forces with the American army and a friendship treaty was create and signed between the two countries. Had the Americans not been offered such crucial help from other countries, their forces would be much weaker and their chances against the world's strongest army and navy would have been significantly diminished.


Both colonies had different motivations for fighting the war. For the Americans, it consisted mainly of freedom: from taxes, jurisdiction, and unfair representation. They fought for a liberalized society; they fought for their own personal incentives: their families and homes. They struggled for their own sake, and were not forced into war or combat through threat or military obligation. On the other hand, the British army fought for revenge, money, pride, military duty, and on behalf of the Crown -- reasons that might not have reached out or appealed to many British troops. The Americans' motivation and determination stimulated a guiding light and inspiration among their troops and soldiers, providing faith and hope to their reason. When the Americans won small battles, not only did propoganda and a morphing of the truth spread, but it also spread confidence, encouragment, and arrrogance among American hope.

The Americans held the benefit with their 'home field' advantage and their 'modern', accommodating war strategy. Not
Guerilla Warfare Tactics
Guerilla Warfare Tactics
only did they possess better knowledge of the land, the British were across the Atlantic Ocean, and required long supply lines for provisions and supplies. This resulted in a higher inconvenience for the British if they should choose to call for reinforcements, giving Americans the opportunity to gain allies and more troops before the British increase in size or artillery. The challenge of coordinating and handling their forces along the distance also proved a challenge for the British, and miscommunication was also very likely to happen. The Americans used guerilla warfare tactics, which were unconventional to strategies, and while the British were accustomed to European wars, they had much trouble adapting to the American's strategy. Unlike the British that fought in ranks, the Americans fired undercover, hidden and unseen among their environment of nature and the wild. This gave the Americans the element of surprise, and the ability to catch the British off guard as it was a fighting strategy they were not familiar with or knowledgeable on how to come about their defense and offense tactics. Having fought many wars with the same, solidified strategy, the British did not break formation from their ranks or columns while the Americans contrasted with their flexible and amenable tactic, willing to bend to the situation at hand. For example, the Americans were very keen on breaking the traditional war methods to further perplex the British army, specifically seen when they aim for generals, officers and high ranking soldiers to break the British's formation and poise. With a history of shooting generals and leaders considered nearly a 'taboo', the Americans knew very well that a killing the leader of an army was rarely done, seeing as it was considered 'dirty fighting' and dishonorable. The selecting, promoting, and appointing of a new general/leader required time, and was very inconvenient to both parties if both chose to shoot the opponent's nobles, therefore wars amongst european countries and such would never go about shooting the opposing side's high ranking commander. Nevertheless, the Americans, with their adaptable strategy and equal ranking troops, took advantage of this fact and killed British Generals to induce disarray for the British Army.



One can never look at just one fact when facing the victorious and losing side of a war, and many reasons, causes and factors all connect to one another to create the reality of the American Revolution we know today. While the British had the drive to win the war, the Americans' inspiration and motivation proved stronger and more prone to having others emphasize and relate to their cause, bringing and luring allies onto their side. Without their foreign help, their outnumbered soldiers might have faced a great defeat and never seen the future of their powerful colony. Their 'unfamiliar', innovative war strategy outsmarted and confused the enemy's traditional battle plans and concluded the end results of the war with astounding success. Without all these multiples taken into contribution, the Americans would not have won the American Revolution,












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